Joe Sinnott

Joe Sinnott’s first solo professional art job was the backup feature “Trudi” in the St. John Publications humor comic Mopsy #12 (Sept. 1950). In 1951, Sinnott met with editor Stan Lee at Marvel (then Timely/Atlas) Comics, and picked up work, since he’d already been a ghost artist on a Tom Gill-credited story for the company. Sinnott’s first Atlas assignment was likely the four-page Western filler “The Man Who Wouldn’t Die” in Apache Kid #8 (Sept. 1951). He would go on to draw a multitude of stories in many genres for the company throughout the decade.

During a 1957 Atlas “implosion” (when Stan Lee let go most of its staff and freelancers for several months), Sinnott found other work, doing billboards and record covers, ghosting for some DC Comics artists, and a job for Classics Illustrated comics, and began a long association with Treasure Chest comics.

After inking Fantastic Four #5 and one page of issue #6, he worked as both penciler and inker at Marvel, until being tapped as the regular inker on Kirby’s Fantastic Four, from #44 through Kirby’s departure with #102, missing only a couple of issues in the run. He’s generally regarded as Kirby’s best inker of the 1960s, due to his slick style and faithfulness to capturing all the detail Kirby included in his pencil art. The pair’s collaboration, more than any other, set the look of the Marvel “house style” of the 1960s and beyond. Joe still actively pencils and inks today. [source: en.wikipedia.org]

Small Page
Small Page
Small Page
Small Page
Small Page
Small Page
Small Page
Small Page
Small Page