Forums and Art Recent Comments

  • 3 years 21 weeks ago | Mike T
    Mike T's picture

    I think the fact that Royer went with a finer line to provide an atmospheric effect to the bridge and other items in the distance is the best aspect of his inking on this 2-page spread. I'd like to know whether the original pencils were like this, or if Mike did it on his own (rather than conjecture).

  • 3 years 21 weeks ago | Frank Fosco
    Frank Fosco's picture

    Let's not totally give credit (or blame) to Mike here. He probably followed very close to what Jack had drawn. We do know Mike was the most faithful to Jack's pencils, correct?

  • 3 years 21 weeks ago | James Romberger
    James Romberger's picture

    Haha, well, holy mackerel, note to self: watch out because some unverified peoples DO NOT LIKE well-done depth techniques in inking!!!

  • 3 years 21 weeks ago | kc (not verified)
    Anonymous's picture

    well it is what it is; personally I DO NOT LIKE IT; DO NOT LIKE THE TECHNIQUE; we can agree to disagree...no flames no nastiness. That is all ;-)

    kc

  • 3 years 21 weeks ago | Frank Fosco
    Frank Fosco's picture

    I agree with James. That technique by Royer from foreground to background is spot on. It's just not the bridge but the water has the same line weight as well. What you may be having a problem with, kc, is the erraticness of the line which is deliberately done to give the look of decay. Open line shadow and no solid blacks to add to the distance/depth. As a whole, this works.

  • 3 years 21 weeks ago | James Romberger
    James Romberger's picture

    Hmm, you asked a question, I provided a sensible explanation and you choose to just ignore it and still plead incomprehension. That makes a lot of sense

  • 3 years 21 weeks ago | kc (not verified)
    Anonymous's picture

    MIKE is THE BEST IMHO but that technique on that panel puzzles me regardless the explanation

    We'll let it go at that ;-)

  • 3 years 21 weeks ago | James Romberger
    James Romberger's picture

    That inking on the suspension bridge is not "weak" at all, rather it is VERY skillfully done by Mike Royer to be a bit lighter than the foreground elements, to enhance the impression of deep space that is involved in this wonderful drawing

  • 3 years 21 weeks ago | Anonymous (not verified)
    Anonymous's picture

    Why is the inking so 'weak' on the destroyed suspension bridge;(or archway) everything else has the same intensity except for THAT area of the panel?

    kc

  • 3 years 21 weeks ago | MRE1957
    MRE1957's picture

    That anyone could give this less than 5 stars. Just look at the complex human characterization Jack gave our rodent friend on the right. He looks wary, sly and very, very dangerous!

    After the Fourth World books, we all wondered where Kirby would go next. Well, we didn't have to wait long because Kamandi and The Demon were soon upon us. And with double-page spreads like this one, we could tell a new epic was beginning!

  • 3 years 22 weeks ago | Mike T
    Mike T's picture

    Well that explains it! The unstable molecules allowed her to make her nails visible through the costume. She probably just had them done for the pinup. Good thing she limited her costume's invisibility to her nails, otherwise she could have had some trouble with the Comics Code folks.

  • 3 years 22 weeks ago | Krackles
    Krackles's picture

    Nothing fantastic there, just your regular unstable molecules fabric… That's common knowledge!

  • 3 years 22 weeks ago | Mike T
    Mike T's picture

    I always loved how the King drew such elegant, tapering fingers on his women, and here is a standout example. And there's no other way to put it: It's FANTASTIC that you can see Sue's finger nails through her gloves!

  • 3 years 22 weeks ago | MRE1957
    MRE1957's picture

    It looks like Chic probably prettied up Sue's eyes—similar to what Mike Royer did to Big Barda's face on the splash page to Mister Miracle #5—not that I'm complaining! (After all, it is a pin-up!)

  • 3 years 22 weeks ago | MRE1957
    MRE1957's picture

    I remember not being sure what to think of Mike's inks the first time I saw them. His style was so different from previous Kirby inkers (especially Coletta). But after I dug out my copy of the Kirby Unleashed portfolio, I understood how faithful Royer's inks were to Jack's pencils.

  • 3 years 22 weeks ago | MRE1957
    MRE1957's picture

    This issue featuring Big Barda sure got my adolescent heart racing! And ya gotta love the expressions on the delivery guys' faces, as well as, the 1970s "women's lib" comment!

  • 3 years 22 weeks ago | MRE1957
    MRE1957's picture

    The masterful perspective of the first panel alone should get this page four stars! (And I'm getting vertigo the longer I stare at it.)

  • 3 years 22 weeks ago | MRE1957
    MRE1957's picture

    From my perspective, this is one of the best Kirby splashes ever! The depth Jack has achieved here is beyond words. Also love Ayers inking on all of the Kirby/Lee Rawhide Kid stories. The textures and folds in the clothes, gloves and boots are absolutely masterful! The only thing missing is the familiar Kirby/Ayers byline (although Stan was sure to get his full name on it). And after seeing this, I absolutely have to get the Rawhide Kid Marvel Masterworks volumes.

  • 3 years 23 weeks ago | Mike T
    Mike T's picture

    That issue (107) was sheer greatness! It was such a great story, and far from the beaten path of superhero yarns at that. Stan and Jack (or at least Jack) poured a lot of creative energy into this title at this time, determined to make the mag a success, which they did. 106 and 107 were the best one-shots in comics that year (which is saying a lot).

    I agree with you on that splash too--such impact!

    Syd did seem to add that golden age feel to CA, though that's not the reason why I admire his inking. It's his use of shadow and the realism he imparts to the King's pencils that grabs me.

  • 3 years 23 weeks ago | MRE1957
    MRE1957's picture

    Syd's inking added such a unique and different quality to Jack's pencils (as compared to Sinnott, Ayers, Colletta and Giacoia). It reminded me of the reprinted Simon & Kirby 1940s Cap stories I was reading in Fantasy Masterpieces at that time—which make sense since I later learned that many of them had been inked by Shores! My favorite Cap issue that Shores inked in the1960s was #107 featuring Dr. Faustus in "If The Past Be Not Dead." The splash page was amazing!

  • 3 years 23 weeks ago | Anonymous
    Anonymous's picture

    I wanted the book and tried to budget for it, but expenses knocked it out of the picture. Reading the comments here I'm relived the way things worked out. It sounds to me like the scans at this web page are a better way of looking at the art.

  • 3 years 24 weeks ago | ofolayne
    ofolayne's picture

    I love the 'zoom' option. Not only do we see that un-inked Cap figure
    in panel 5, but we also see that Dick didn't ink the lower part of Cap's leg in panel 3 - and it really
    wasn't necessary to have it. 2 seconds work for Dick - I think he left it off for clarity reasons (maybe
    the same thinking happened in panel 5??). I also like that we can see that the right side border of
    panel 3 is moved slightly, to accommodate the slightly overflowing lettering.

  • 3 years 24 weeks ago | MRE1957
    MRE1957's picture

    in the Kirby/Royer Superman face. And ironic isn't it that seven years after this drawing, Brando played Jor-El in the 1978 Superman movie. Hmm, maybe Jack really could see into the future...

  • 3 years 24 weeks ago | MRE1957
    MRE1957's picture

    It wouldn't surprise me if Stan instructed Dick to erase that figure of Cap since I've never seen another example of Ayers not inking everything that Kirby put on the page.

  • 3 years 24 weeks ago | MRE1957
    MRE1957's picture

    Outstanding Kirby action sequence but Reinman's inking leaves a lot to be desired.

    Even so, it still deserves it four stars.